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Jobs

Our industry specialists will listen to your aspirations and share your story with New Zealand’s most prestigious organisations. Together, let’s write the next chapter of your career.

See all jobs

Exclusive Recruitment Partners

Explore the opportunities from a range of organisations that exclusively partner with Robert Walters for their hiring needs.

Learn more
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Kia ora. For us, recruitment is more than just a job. We understand that behind every opportunity is the chance to make a difference to people’s lives.

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Our people are the difference. Hear stories from our people to learn more about a career at Robert Walters New Zealand

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Contact Us

Truly global and proudly local, we’ve been serving New Zealand for over 25 years with offices in Auckland, Christchurch and Wellington.

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How to find an employer you believe in: 6 key questions to ask

We all want to work for a company that we can feel good about and that’s aligned with our core values. So how do you find an employer you can believe in? Here are a few key questions to ask…

1. What is said about the company in the news?

Simply doing an internet news search and going back over a few years’ headlines will give you a good sense of what your potential employer is like ethically, and how the business is perceived in the wider world. 

Are there stories about R&D, philanthropic initiatives and exciting sponsorship deals? Or is the picture more one of suspected tax evasion, ruthless efficiencies and employee dissatisfaction? A bit of targeted Googling will soon reveal the ethical grain of any organisation. 

2. What is the company leader like?

The leader of a business is the embodiment of its vision. If you can’t believe in the leader, you’ll struggle to believe in the organisation that they preside over. 

According to research, there’s even a link between the business performance of a company and the integrity of its CEO, so make sure you carry out a bit of due diligence on the boss. What’s their track record on the issues that matter to you, such as the environment or diversity or gender pay? A great way to do this is to check their CEO rating on Glassdoor to see what employees really think of them.

3. Is there real proof of ethical practice? 

Many companies will flash their ethical values across their websites and promotional materials – indeed, it’s a requirement to demonstrate policies in certain areas such as diversity and recycling. But talk is easy: it’s important to scratch the surface and ask if the company really delivers on its promises. 

Dig a little deeper and see if proof of CSR in action can be found in the news, on the internet or on the company’s social media channels. Is there evidence of real projects happening and employees getting involved in things like volunteering and fundraising? 

4. How eco-friendly is the organisation?

Every business and every individual must play their part in protecting the environment, and if this is something you’re passionate about, you’ll want to look hard at how your potential employer is contributing to a greener world. 

Of course, it depends on the industry, and different sectors face different challenges: the carbon footprint of an airline, for example, is likely to be inherently more challenging than that of a digital media agency. But what matters is the way in which the organisation responds to the specific challenges it faces, and how it measures up to its peers.  

Make sure you look for tangible evidence of companies making real commitments and meeting or even exceeding them in measurably effective ways. Take a look at the company’s sustainability report or annual report to see if they’ve achieved any independent ratings or if they’re working with reputable organisations.

5. How has the company addressed any criticisms that have been made against it or its sector?

In the race to make profits, companies can be guilty of cutting corners and making mistakes. But beyond the negative reviews, regulatory infringements or critical press coverage, an important question to ask is: what happened next?  

A key test of a company with integrity is the way in which it responds to criticism or censure. Does it look to honestly address its faults, and put measures in place to stop them happening again? Or does it lurch from one PR or customer service crisis to the next? 

Likewise, you can also look at how the company responds to negative Glassdoor reviews. Do they seem open to feedback and willing to engage with critics? Or are their responses defensive?

6. What does the company’s social presence tell you about the culture?

You can tell a lot about a company by looking at their social media channels. Are they distant and corporate-sounding, or do they come across as engaged and in touch with the issues their people care about? Social channels allow a company to showcase life behind the scenes giving you an insight into the culture. 

Employer review sites like Glassdoor are another good source of insights into employer culture, although it’s important to remember that every individual assessment is subjective. 

When looking at all such content, consider: Do you get a sense of a team pulling together? Do people look like they enjoy socialising together? Do they get together behind good causes? Does it look like a culture that celebrates achievements and truly supports development for all? Or do you sense evidence of less desirable traits, such as presenteeism, lack of innovation and demotivated employees?


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